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Education (512 Books)


Education as a category refers to the formal process by which society deliberately transmits its accumulated knowledge, skills, customs and values from one generation to another.

 
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Na Honua Mauli Ola

By: Native Hawaiian Education Council

Language is the fiber that binds us to our cultural identity. The UH Hilo College of Hawaiian Language, Ka Haka Ula O Keelikolani was established in 1997 by the Hawaii State Legislature to “serve as a focal point for the states efforts to revitalize the Hawaiian language through teacher training, undergraduate and graduate study of Hawaiian, community outreach, research and testing, use of technology, national and international cooperation, and the development of li...

There will be a culturally enlightened Hawaiian nation, there will be a Hawaiian nation enlightened. The Native Hawaiian Education Council (NHEC) was established by Congress in 1994, and reauthorized as part of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Public Law 107-110, Title VII, Part B, also known as the Native Hawaiian Education Act. Among other things, this act authorizes the Secretary of Education to make a direct grant to the Education Council to coordinate the ...

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Ka Hae Hoonani (The Banner of Praise)

By: Paiia Ma Nu Yoka

Nau makou e kai aloha Ma na kahawai maikai, Ma na kula uliuli. Kahi e maona ai. E aloha, e aloha, Kiai, a hoomalu mai. Mai haalele a kuu wale Ia makou na keiki nei. O auwana alilo aku Ma na waonahele e. E aloha, e aloha, Hoopaa ma kou pa maikai. Kena mai ke kahuhipa, I na kamalii liilii E kaiia i o na la I hoomaikaiia mai. E aloha, e aloha, I koonei man kamalii. Eia makou na haumana o ke kula maikai nei, Ke hele la i ke Kahu; Kahuhipa maikai e. E al...

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Ho'Oulu : Our Time of Becoming : Collected Early Writings of Manul...

By: Manulani Aluli Meyer

This kakau is named Halaloa and it sits on my left shoulder. Many distinct ideas come forth: one is the enduring breath of the sun. The sun, la, her-alds change, growth, and transformation. Ha, breath, is the fundamental animating principle of life that connects us to our mystical origins. Halaloa also holds the image of hala, of death, of change, of stripping away. Inside the circle there are two main images: a wave and a koru, or fern. It represents ocean and ear...

Ke welina mai nei. I wanted to spend a few moments with you before you dip into the muliwai—where sea water meets fresh; where theory meets practice. There is life there. As with the ideas you are about to read. They serve as a threshold into which I am now entered—a new seeing of the world that is wider than ever imagined. It began by listening to our people. I learned of our distinctness. Our Light. Our commonality with the world. Because I am a philosopher ...

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Genealogy Book Volume 44 : Eia Ka Lani Ke Koi Pae Moku Ka Lauhulu ...

By: Puhi Adams

This book of genealogies, Kumuhonua, was copied from the Honolulu Archives, Book #44, back in the eighties. This book contains mostly ancient genealogies, with some lines leading into the 19th century. You will not find very many modern family connections in this book. In this book, Kumuhonua, you will find pieces of information not available in other published genealogies. For example, Fornander states that he doesn't know from which family descends Kapoleia Kauila,...

Ma keia wahi e hoomaha iki ka nana ana no ke kuamoo nui, no ka mea, o keia mau kanaka o Puna ma laua o Hema he mau mahoe laua a ma o laua ?la i kaawale ai na alii ma ka hanau ana o Punai kaawale ai na alii o Oahu a me Kauai, a o ke kuamoo hoi o na alii o Maui a me Hawaii e puka anaia maloko a ke kaikaina o Puna oia hoi o Hema, no ka mea, o Hema ka mea iaia ke kuamoo malalo iho, a mahope aku ka Puna ke kaikuana o Hema, nolaila, ua kapaia e ka poe kahiko he haku ko Hawaii ...

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Hulili Vol. 1 No. 1 2004

By: Shawn Malia Kanaiaupuni, Ph. D.

Welina mai! Welcome to the inaugural issue of Hulili, a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal on Hawaiian well-being. The word hulili is defined as “ladder, bridge, as to scale a cliff or cross a gully” (Hawaiian Dictionary, Pukui & Elbert, 1986, p. 89). Our vision for Hulili is to create a multidisciplinary forum for current research that examines the nature, needs, and strengths of Hawaiians, their families, and their communities. We believe that through collabo...

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Hulili Vol. 2 No. 1 2005

By: Shawn Malia Kanaiaupuni, Ph. D.

The year 2005 has been a pivotal time for Native Hawaiians. As a community, we have come together with a heightened purpose and passion for what it means to be an indigenous people. This is critical in light of persistent legal threats to Hawaiian institutions such as Kamehameha Schools, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands. As Hawaiian issues gain momentum locally and nationally, one thing is clear: The Hawaiian voice matters, and...

Kanaka means human being. Maoli means true, real, genuine. We have relearned that it also means to come from the aina, the land, and to return to the aina. Aka (yet), aina is more than lepo, the soil, for aina means “that which feeds. ” No laila, aina is Papa, our Earth Mother, including wai (all waters), kai (all seas), Ka Moananui (Oceania), and beyond. Aina is also Wakea, our Sky Father, ea (air), lani (all heavens, all suns, all moons and all stars), and beyond....

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Hulili Vol. 3 No. 1 2006

By: Shawn Malia Kanaiaupuni, Ph. D.

A Hawaiian proverb says, “Ho ae ka ike heenalu i ka hokua o ka ale,” or “show your knowledge of surfing on the back of the wave. ” This saying suggests that talking about ones knowledge and skill is not enough; let it be proven (Olelo Noeau, 1013). As researchers, we like the process of discovery. We thrive on evidence. We design surveys and studies to find evidence that confirms our hunches. We want to test whether a certain theory is valid and meaningful. We wan...

This is the hour of our remembering, of our putting those parts of ourselves that have been dismembered and disenfranchised back together again. It is only from this place of wholeness, our holiness, that we can dream once more. And when we dream, let it be of a Hawaii where our people are healthy and vibrant, where we no longer kill ourselves with despair and abuse. Let us dream a Hawaii, as Dr. Manu Meyer says, “where our children are inspired to make knowledge joyful....

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Hulili Vol. 4 No. 1 2007

By: Shawn Malia Kanaiaupuni, Ph. D.

It is with great humility and pride that I take pen in hand to submit the newest issue of Hulili to you. Even in this day and age of sophisticated technology and rapid pace, one of the most amazing and inspiring things about being human is the power of the spirit and the depth of connections that it brings, binding us to each other, to animate and inanimate life forms, to the past of our ancestors, and yet so vigorously to the future. From these connections come o...

Every journey begins with a dream, a vision that can unite others. When people come together around a set of shared values, they can achieve extraordinary things. It is true that every voyage has its share of hardships. Sometimes the challenges come from outside the community, and other times they come from within. Most often they come from inside ourselves, stemming from feelings of fear and inadequacy. We rely on our teachers and leaders to guide us through times ...

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Hulili Vol. 5 No. 1 2008

By: Shawn Malia Kanaiaupuni, Ph. D.

The intimate connection between Hawaiians and aina (land) is the focus of two articles this year. In a piece that weaves together scholarly research and personal moolelo (storytelling), cultural beliefs about land, language, and community reveal strong implications for understanding Hawaiian well-being. Likewise, the importance of cultivating a strong sense of place among students and their families is emphasized within Ike Aina, a curriculum grounded in experiential l...

Molokai: Future of a Hawaiian Island This vision statement was created by numerous groups of the Molokai community and largely based on work from the generations before us. There are too many contributors to list, but on page 52, there is a hui of opio and makua who are instrumental in carrying forward the vision of this document, and they may be contacted for further information. In light of longstanding challenges to our aina (land), cultural tradi- tions, and lifest...

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O Ka Hulipoepoe (The Globe)

By: L. Andrews

This volume contains information on world geography and also touches on some astronomy. It explains our environment here on earth as well as the objects we observe from Earth in the sky.

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Hawaiian Language Imprints

By: Bernice Judd

This bibliography includes all known titles published in the Hawaiian language anywhere in the world between 1822 and the end of the century. The only items not listed are one-page broadsides, government documents, serials, sheet music, and programs for events such as concerts, royal functions, and the like. The work was begun in 1938 by Bernice Judd of the Hawaiian Mission Children's Society Library at the suggestion of Dr. Clarence Brigham, director of the American Ant...

The first chapter in the history of Hawaiian printing becomes primarily a resumé of the linguistic efforts of the early missionaries to the Sandwich Islands. To a researcher perhaps the most remarkable feature of the story is that the missionaries began their printing activities even before they had settled on a standard alphabet and orthography for the hitherto unwritten Hawaiian language. The members of the Sandwich Islands Mission sent from Boston by the American Boar...

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An Historic Inventory of the Physical, Social and Economic and Ind...

By: Territorial Planning Board

Appreciation is hereby expressed to the Works Progress Administration for cooperation obtained through Project 507 which provided much of the clerical, statistical and cartographical assistance entailed in the preparation of this report and other data to be coordinated and released in subsequent reports; and, to the many Collaborators whose spontaneous response to the Territory’s needs in planning has furnished guidance and inspiration in this our First Progress Report.

There is hereby created a Territorial Planning Board consisting of nine members. The Superintendent of Public Works, the President of the Board of Agriculture and Forestry and the Federal Public Works Administrator or in the event there is no Public Works Administrator then the Federal representative of Public Works who shall be designated by the Governor shall be ex-officio members of the Planning Board. The other six members of the Planning Board shall be appointed b...

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He Mo'Olelo No 'Ivanaho

By: Lokahi Antonio

O ke kaao moolelo o Ivanaho, aole no i hoomaka mai ia mai kona mau la opiopio mai a hiki i kona hopena, aka, ua hoomaka mai no ma hope iho o kona hoi ana mai i Enelani, ma hope iho o kona hele ana me Rikeke I o Enelani i ke Kaua Kea, o ia hoi ke Kaua Kerusade i Palesetina. O ke "Koa o Ivanaho," he punahele no ia na ka Moi Rikeke I i kapa ia o ka "Puuwai Liona," a na ua Moi wiwo ole la i hooili aku i ka inoa "Koa o Ivanaho," ma luna ona, a o kona inoa maoli nae o Wilifere...

I loko o kela okana aina oluolu o Enelani e hoopulu ia ana e ka muliwai Dona, ma laila kekahi ululaau nui i ka wa kahiko nana i uhi aku i ka hapa nui o na awawa a me na puu e waiho ana ma waena o Sefila a me ke kaona oluolu o Donekesata. O na koe o ua ululaau nunui nei, e ike ia no ia i keia manawa ma na noho hanohano o Wenewota, Wanalife, a me Rotehama a puni. Ma anei i holoholo ai i ka wa kahiko ke deragona kupua o Wenale; a ma anei no i hoouka ia ai ka nui o na kaua w...

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Kamaaina au Ia Kaaawa (I Know Kaaawa)

By: Koolauloa Early Education Program

Na Kamalei—He Papahana Ho‘ona‘auao Kamali‘i ia no loko mai o kekahi hui ku i ka ‘auhau ‘ole no ka ‘oiwi Hawai‘i. Aia kekahi i loko o keia ‘ahahui he polokal- amu ho‘ona‘auao makua/kamali‘i no ka lawelawe ‘ana i na ‘ohana o Ko‘olauloa ma ka mokupuni o O‘ahu. Me ke kokua kala ‘ana o ka Administration for Na- tive Americans no ka pahana Na Kama o Ko‘olauLoa, ha‘awi keia ‘ahahui i na ‘ohana i mau lawelawe ‘ohana a me na ha‘awina ho‘ona‘auao ho‘i no ka ulu maika‘i ‘ana...

Vowel pronunciation: Ka Papa Puana The (5) Hawaiian vowels are pronounced similar to the following English words. A sounds like U in UMBRELLA E sounds like E in RED I sounds like E in HE O sounds like O in GO U sounds like OO in MOON

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No Ka'Aimalu

By: Eve Furchgott

Kakoo a paipai ka Hale Kuamoo-Kikowaena Olelo Hawaii i ka hookumu ana i ka olelo Hawaii, o ia ka olelo kaiapuni o na kula, o ke aupuni, o na oihana like ole, i lohe ia mai hoi ka olelo Hawaii mai o a o o Hawaii Pae Aina. Na ka Hale Kuamoo e hoomohala nei i na haawina e pono ai ka holomua o ka olelo Hawaii ana ma na ano poaiapili like ole e like hoi me ka haawina olelo Hawaii no na kula olelo Hawaii, na papahana kakoo kumu, ka nupepa o Na Maka O Kana, a me ka puke weheweh...

O Kihakelea ke kane a o Kaipoleimanu ka wahine. Hanau mai na laua elua no keiki. O ka mua, o Pupukanioe he kane. O ka lua, o Nauluahoku he kaikamahine. O Panaiahakea kahi noho o keia mau keiki me ko laua mau makua.

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He Moolelo Hooniua Puuwai No Olando Kaaka (A Heart Stirring Tale o...

By: W. D. Alexander, Jr

Aia ma kekahi la malie lailai o ka malama o Mei, iloko boi o ke kan kupulau, e ku ana he kanaka opio a ui lua ole ma ka aoao akau o ua muliwai la o James, ma kahi he kanakolukumamalima mile mauka aku o ke kulanakauhale. Ma keia wahi a keia opio e ku nei, he wahi ponaha malaelae uuku wale no keia, oiai, ua nee papa. ka ululaau mao a maanei o ia wahi a kiei i ka muliwai. O ka opio e ku nei, me he la aole paha i kaupono aku kona mau makahiki i ka iwakalua, aka, iloko no nae...

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Kahuaola

By: Kamoaelehua Walk

Na Kamalei-K. E. E. P. – Koolauloa Early Education Program is a Native Hawaiian nonprofit organization that includes Ho‘ala Na Pua, a parent-child interaction and family education program that services the families of Ko‘olauloa, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. The Houlu Hou Project: Stories Told By Us is a project of Na Kamalei that is funded in part by the Administration for Native Americans. The project goal is to provide families with services and opportunities that...

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Moolelo Hawaii O Kalapana: Ke Keiki Hoopapa O Puna

By: William H. Wilson

Hoolaa ia keia moolelo ia Keonaona Lorch, ke kanaka kaha kii o keia moolelo nei o Kalapana. He nani kona hilinai i ke akua a me kona hoike mau ana i kona oiaio ma kana mau hana a pau.

O Kanepoiki ke kane a o Halepaki ka wahine. O laua na makua o Kalapana, ke keiki hoopapa. O Kona, mokupuni o Hawaii, ko Kanepoiki one hanau a he keiki papa no hoi o ia no ia aina. A i Kauai, A ke ao lewa i luna, A ka pua nana i kai o Wailua, i hanau ia ai o Halepaki. O Kapalaoa kekahi inoa o Halepaki a ua kapa ia ka aina ana i noho ai i Kona o Kapalaoa.

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Hana Hou : The Kamehameha Journal of Education

By: Kamehameha Schools

The first issue of the Kamehameha Journal of Education was published in January 1990 to share ideas, strategies, and research about the education of Hawaii's children. The Journal grew from 1,000 copies to 3,500 copies per issue over a period of six years. Hana Hou is a collection of articles from all twelve issues that represents the breadth of topics the Journal explored. We saw this journal as a chance to improve education and bring important information, strategi...

Teaching and learning can—and does—go on in strange places. For so long, parents and teachers delegated learning to a formal setting with four walls, books, and a teacher teaching. Yet, those same parents and teachers taught children many unplanned—and often unintended—attitudes, language, and knowledge outside those walls. We learn from everything we do and the keys are our models and the richness of the learning environment. The three articles in this section descr...

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Ke Alakai O Ke Kanaka Hawaii (Part I)

By: Joseph M. Poepoe
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